« Freshening Up | Main | The Tomato Blog »

August 04, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e553d4f5e288330120a51df097970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Awe Shucks: The Truth About Corn:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Actually, I have thought about corn quite a bit over the last few years, and I suspect most savvy, sustainable-minded folks have done the same thanks to movies like King Corn and other press about high fructose corn syrup and ethanol. Your post seems generally in praise of corn, but the quotation marks around "'cheap'"indicate that you recognize the downside of what this wonder-commodity promises. Since you are in the food industry, I would be very interested to hear your genuine opinions about the use of corn syrup and the like in processed foods.

Chelsey, The "cheap" was meant to be tongue in cheek. The use of corn for fuel is putting a hardship on crop land and the enviornment. Corn is now being grown in areas that require irrigation. That was not the case before ethanol. As for corn syrup. We have become a sugar addicted nation and the statistics around obesity and diabetes tend to prove it. Our eating habits should move away from corn syrup and the many items created with it. But yes, I am a fan of corn and it's many uses.

I'd like to taste more primitive forms of corn, or maize, similar to what was eaten in Meso America.

Was it more flavorful or higher in fiber or protein? Are these varieties still being grown and harvested in Central or South America?

I've read that ancient grains are very nutrient dense and I've eaten some of them. I'm very interested in growing some myself to gain a better understanding of them. You raise a good question though -- maybe it will be the subject of a future blog post.

i am in complete agreement with david, corn is being grown in areas that require irrigation. That was not the case before ethanol. i too love having corn.

The comments to this entry are closed.